Discussion

COVID and Health Disparities

02/25 Thursday | 5pm

RSVP is required. Please RSVP here.

The Institute for Public Knowledge, in partnership with NYU’s Cross-Cutting Initiative on Inequality, invites you to join a conversation on COVID-19 and Health Disparities in the series on “COVID-19 and Inequality.” The event will be moderated by Eric Klinenberg featuring Melody Goodman, Jacob William Faber, and Chau Trinh-Shevrin. In this episode, this series will examine the health disparities that the pandemic accelerated and made more visible.

We encourage you to RSVP and join us live to pose your questions directly to the panel. For those unable to attend live, we will record and upload each event to IPK’s YouTube channel here.

Melody Goodman is an Associate Dean for Research and an Associate Professor of Biostatistics at New York University School of Global Public Health. Dr. Goodman conducts applied biostatistical and survey research for community-based interventions and health disparities research with a strong focus on measurement. Additionally, through academic-community collaborations, she implements, evaluates, and enhances the infrastructure of community-engaged research, in order to mitigate health disparities.The National Institutes of Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Verizon Foundation, Long Island Community Foundation, Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and Susan G. Komen for the Cure have funded her work. She has over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and two books (2018 Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group); 1) Public Health Research Methods for Partnerships and Practice and 2) Biostatistics for Clinical and Public Health Research. Dr. Goodman is a biostatistician and research methodologist with a large statistical toolbox. Her research interest is on identifying origins of health disparities and developing, as necessary, evidence-based primary prevention strategies to reduce these health disparities.

Jacob William Faber is an Associate Professor at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service and holds a joint appointment in NYU’s Sociology Department. His research and teaching focuses on spatial inequality. He leverages observational and experimental methods to study the mechanisms responsible for sorting individuals across space and how the distribution of people by race and class interacts with political, social, and ecological systems to create and sustain economic disparities. While there is a rich literature exploring the geography of opportunity, there remain many unsettled questions about the causes of segregation and its effects on the residents of urban ghettos, wealthy suburbs, and the diverse set of places in between.

Chau Trinh-Shevrin, DrPH is Professor of Population Health and Medicine and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Population Health at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine.  Working with academic and community partners in New York City, Dr. Trinh-Shevrin founded and established the NYU Center for the Study of Asian American Health (CSAAH) in 2003, an National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) National Center of Excellence at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Eric Klinenberg is Helen Gould Shepard Professor of Social Science and Director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. He is the author of Palaces for the People: How Social Infrastructure Can Help Fight Inequality, Polarization, and the Decline of Civic Life (Crown, 2018), Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone (The Penguin Press, 2012), Fighting for Air: The Battle to Control America’s Media (Metropolitan Books, 2007), and Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago (University of Chicago Press, 2002), as well as the editor of Cultural Production in a Digital Age, co-editor of Antidemocracy in America (Columbia University Press, 2019), and co-author, with Aziz Ansari, of the New York Times #1 bestseller Modern Romance (The Penguin Press, 2015). His scholarly work has been published in journals including the American Sociological Review, Theory and Society, and Ethnography, and he has contributed to The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, and This American Life.

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